Using an information literacy curriculum map as a means of communication and accountability for stakeholders in higher education

Main Article Content

Leslin H Charles

Abstract

Many academic libraries are coping with limited library staff, a burgeoning student population, and constantly evolving curriculum. How can academic librarians ensure that students are receiving a systematic and hierarchical set of information literacy (IL) competencies that will make them agile and adept information seekers and users who can cope with changing modes of information delivery and access? How can they be accountable to students, themselves, and to their institutions? Creating and implementing an information literacy curriculum map (ILCM) can provide a cohesive delivery of IL across the curriculum. A map aligns IL competencies with core courses, specific courses in a discipline, and assessment points. This article will describe the creation and implementation of an ILCM in addressing the needs of stakeholders at colleges and universities. The process of creating and use of the ILCM has facilitated and increased communication among teaching faculty, administrators, and academic librarians at Berkeley College. It has allowed the librarians to be more intentional in their teaching and assessment strategies. Furthermore, an ILCM used in conjunction with an assessment plan has served to make the IL programme and activities more transparent to the institution, thereby ensuring accountability to internal stakeholders and external reviewers.  

Article Details

How to Cite
CHARLES, Leslin H. Using an information literacy curriculum map as a means of communication and accountability for stakeholders in higher education. Journal of Information Literacy, [S.l.], v. 9, n. 1, p. 47-61, june 2015. ISSN 1750-5968. Available at: <https://ojs.lboro.ac.uk/JIL/article/view/PRA-V9-I1-4>. Date accessed: 22 mar. 2019. doi: https://doi.org/10.11645/9.1.1959.
Keywords
curriculum map; information literacy; library instruction; assessment; faculty; collaboration; communication; academic libraries; higher education; USA
Section
Peer reviewed articles