How much do first-year undergraduate students in Norway know about information literacy?

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Ellen Nierenberg Øyvind Gjems Fjeldbu

Abstract

This study aims to document first-year undergraduate students’ information literacy (IL) skills at a typical university college in Norway. This research is the first of its kind in Norway as previous studies on new students have focused mainly on the literature search. Prior to library instruction a selection of these students completed a survey with questions on the critical evaluation of sources, on plagiarism and on citing sources. Survey questions were designed to reflect the content of the library course in IL. Although most students were confident that they could avoid plagiarism when writing, many had large gaps in their knowledge, and lacked essential skills. Results also show that new students are better at evaluating sources than they are at citing them. Ethical aspects of plagiarism are discussed and comparisons drawn between students coming directly from upper secondary school and those who have some previous higher education.

Article Details

How to Cite
NIERENBERG, Ellen; FJELDBU, Øyvind Gjems. How much do first-year undergraduate students in Norway know about information literacy?. Journal of Information Literacy, [S.l.], v. 9, n. 1, p. 15-33, june 2015. ISSN 1750-5968. Available at: <https://ojs.lboro.ac.uk/JIL/article/view/PRA-V9-I1-2>. Date accessed: 18 mar. 2019. doi: https://doi.org/10.11645/9.1.1983.
Keywords
students, information literacy, library instruction, plagiarism, citations, references, source evaluation, Norway
Section
Peer reviewed articles