Reading between the lines: An examination of first-year university students’ perceptions of and confidence with information literacy

Main Article Content

Beverly J Dann, Dr http://orcid.org/0000-0003-4626-4629 Anne Drabble, Dr http://orcid.org/0000-0003-1772-8439 Janet Martin, Dr http://orcid.org/0000-0003-3390-6039

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to explore how first-year university students at a regional university in Australia perceive and use Information Literacy (IL) as they transition from school to university. A survey method was used to gather data through pre- and post-intervention surveys with 1,333 first-year students enrolled in their first semester of study across all disciplines at the university. The study identified that between 25–35% of students did not enjoy reading, with many students preferring not to read. Students arrived at university with largely misguided confidence in their personal IL skills, especially the skills needed to meet the demands of university level coursework, with up to 47% of students unlikely to have experienced well-resourced libraries at school. The study concludes that implications for university teaching include gaining an early understanding of the IL skills students have when they arrive at university, and the explicit teaching of IL skills, given the identified impact of IL skills on student success and retention rates.

Article Details

How to Cite
DANN, Beverly J; DRABBLE, Anne; MARTIN, Janet. Reading between the lines: An examination of first-year university students’ perceptions of and confidence with information literacy. Journal of Information Literacy, [S.l.], v. 16, n. 1, p. 50-69, june 2022. ISSN 1750-5968. Available at: <https://ojs.lboro.ac.uk/JIL/article/view/PRA-V16-I1-3>. Date accessed: 01 july 2022. doi: https://doi.org/10.11645/16.1.3106.
Section
Research articles (peer-reviewed articles)