JIL's Ethical Values

The Journal of Information Literacy is committed to open and equitable systems of scholarship, including in relation to people, content and systems. The following policies and guidelines represent the steps that we are taking to meet these goals.

Aims and Scope
Acceptance Rate
Inclusive Language
Acknowledgements
Open Access
Open Data Sharing
Peer Review
Copyright
Accessibility
Name Change Policy
Indexing
Affiliation
Hosting

Aims and Scope

The Journal of Information Literacy (JIL) is an international  peer-reviewed journal and is aimed at librarians, information professionals and academics who teach and/or research all aspects of information literacy. The journal includes articles from established and new authors that investigate many different areas of information literacy, including school, academic and national libraries, health care settings, and the public sector such as the workplace and government. We actively encourage and support submissions from underrepresented groups -- such as by race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, disability -- in the information sector as well as the sharing of expertise between all information literacy professionals.

We welcome inquiries about or suggestions of alternative formats, including multimedia or art/illustration-based work.

Acceptance Rate 

JIL has an acceptance rate of around 30% for articles submitted to the journal. The most common reason we decline submissions is because they do not match the journal's priorities and standards, which are extensively detailed in our guidelines for submission. Please read the guidelines carefully and consider sending a query letter at any stage of your research.  We are always happy to receive query letters and discuss with you the fit of your project with the goals of the journal.

Inclusive Language

We encourage the use of inclusive language in all journal submissions. Inclusive language refers to sensitively chosen words that should be free from bias, stereotyping, sexism, racism, and negative connotations, and describe people in the ways in which they wish to be described. The use of inclusive language acknowledges diversity, respect and difference. 

General guidelines for reducing bias in writing include: Describing appropriately, including only focusing on relevant characteristics but acknowledging that differences do exist; and Being sensitive to labels, including acknowledging humanity and avoiding false hierarchies. For more details, please consult the APA Guide for reducing bias

Specific recommendations for authors

  • Choose gender-neutral terms whenever possible when writing about collective or generic subjects.
  • Avoid unnecessarily binary terms (e.g., men and women, he or she) when a gender-neutral one will do (e.g., students, they).
  • Always use an individual’s appropriate name, title, pronouns (and/or other gendered morphology). If you don’t know what gendered language a person uses, find out by consulting their website or official biography, or by asking.

Based on Linguistic Society of America recommendations.

Acknowledgements

We encourage authors to formally recognise the work of everyone who has contributed to scholarly output (e.g., open peer review, crediting contributors such as research assistants) in an acknowledgements section (post peer-review). 

The ICMJE recommends that authorship of a paper should be based on the following 4 criteria:

  • Substantial contributions to the conception or design of the work; or the acquisition, analysis, or interpretation of data for the work; AND
  • Drafting the work or revising it critically for important intellectual content; AND
  • Final approval of the version to be published; AND
  • Agreement to be accountable for all aspects of the work in ensuring that questions related to the accuracy or integrity of any part of the work are appropriately investigated and resolved.

Contributors who do not meet the above criteria for authorship should be acknowledged. Examples of activities that may not qualify someone for authorship are: acquisition of funding; general supervision of a research group or general administrative support; writing assistance, technical editing, language editing, and proofreading. These contributions should be specified (e.g. collected data) and acknowledged individually or as a group.

Based on ICJME Recommendations

Open Access 

JIL provides immediate open access to its content on the principle that making research freely available to the public supports a greater global exchange of knowledge. The journal is published under the Diamond/Platinum Open Access model, because the CILIP Information Literacy Group believes that knowledge should be shared. JIL is therefore free and requires no subscription. In addition authors are not required to pay a fee to be published in JIL.

Open Data Sharing

We suggest that any quantitative research is pre-registered using the Open Science Framework, or an equivalent and that quantitative data produced as part of research is deposited within an Institutional Repository, the Open Science Framework platform, or an equivalent in accordance with any ethical approval given to your study. A link to your data will be placed alongside your article. An accessibility statement should be provided when data is not open access.

Peer Review

We adhere to the principles and guidelines of ethical peer reviewing as outlined in the COPE Guidelines. We also actively promote anti-racist scholarly reviewing practices

Specific actions we have taken include:

  • Recognise a range of expertise: Once reviews have been written, the Editor explicitly works to frame reviewer comments to support author revisions; we are willing to imagine the field beyond our individual perspectives. 
  • Recognise harmful scholarly work: We have identified and replaced exclusionary terms or descriptions in aims and scope, journal information, and other journal documentation.
  • Prioritise humanity over production: We proactively contact reviewers to offer deadline extensions or new deadlines, and update authors accordingly.
  • Make the review process transparent: Our peer review process is described in detail on the journal website so that new or emerging authors know what to expect at every stage of the publication process.
  • Value the labor of those involved in the review process: We document the number of reviews each person has conducted to avoid overburdening specific scholars and are explicit about the number of reviews an editorial board member is expected to conduct.
  • Commit to inclusivity among reviewers and in editorial board makeup: We invite editorial board members who reflect the diversity of the field and actively encourage the recruitment of peer reviewers from under-represented and marginalised groups.

JIL follows a double-anonymous peer review process, meaning that articles are read by at least two reviewers who have no knowledge of the author’s identity

The role of the peer reviewer is twofold: Firstly, to advise the editor as to whether the paper is suitable for publication and, if so, what stage of development it has reached.  This is done by providing one of the following recommendations:

a. Accept with no changes

b. Minor revisions: accept if specified minor changes are made; no re-review is necessary

c. Resubmit for review: substantial changes are needed before the article is resubmitted for a second round of peer review with the same reviewers

d. Inappropriate for publication by JIL: this is generally because the scope of the article sits outside the journal’s remit or because the reviewer feels that no amount of editing would raise the article to the required standards.

Secondly, the peer reviewer will act as a constructively critical friend to the author, providing detailed and practical feedback on all the aspects of the article found in the review form. Where changes to an article are suggested, the rationale for the suggestion should be clearly explained and contextualised with reference to the field of information literacy research and its methods. Feedback should be constructive, comprehensive and courteous, particularly if changes to the article reviewed are suggested. The role of peer reviewer is a privileged one and must be undertaken with empathy and integrity. Dismissive language, insufficient engagement with the work, and one-sentence feedback are not acceptable.

Reviewers will assess an article from the perspective of JIL readers at large and not just from their own viewpoint. This means that even if they personally like the article they should ensure that the topic is of relevance to a wider audience. Reviewers will also ensure that authors use language that is accessible to readers without specialist knowledge (for example in technical fields such as mobile technology or gaming). If the article employs a register that is overly specialist or technical, reviewers should highlight this problem and make recommendations on how to address it. In order to provide comprehensive, structured and workable feedback reviewers should use the review form.

A reviewer should call to the editor's attention any substantial similarity or overlap between the paper being reviewed and any other published paper of which they have personal knowledge. Reviewers are also asked to identify and highlight relevant published work that has not been cited by the authors.

Copyright

By submitting their articles to JIL the author(s) retain the copyright, but grant the right of first publication to the journal (including publication in print and electronic media). From December 2015 articles published in JIL are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike Licence.

Accessibility

The journal maintains a living document detailing the changes we have made and are planning to make for accessibility (front-end and back-end of the system). 

Name Change Policy

JIL’s author name change policy allows authors to retrospectively update their names or pronouns in any work published in JIL, including peer reviewed articles, project reports and book reviews. Authors may change their name for numerous reasons including marriage, divorce, religion, gender identity and other personal reasons. JIL respects the rights of our authors to their identities and we are committed to ensuring a person’s bibliography is attributable to the same name and/or pronoun. Authors may also update any email addresses, biography photos, and other identifiers that are connected to the change in author name. 

Authors wishing to make such changes should contact JIL’s Editor in Chief, jinfolit@gmail.com. Changes will be made directly to the article PDF. We will also re-send article metadata to the services that abstract and index JIL such as EBSCO.

Indexing

JIL is freely available on the open web. Published works are also indexed in the following sources: 

  • DOAJ (Directory of Open Access Journals)
  • ERIC (Education Resources Information Center)
  • LISA (Library and Information Science Abstracts)
  • LISTA (Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts)
  • SCOPUS
  • And can be found through browsing in Browzine.

Affiliation

JIL is the professional journal of the CILIP Information Literacy Group. The group encourages debate and the exchange of knowledge in all aspects of information literacy. The group:

Hosting

Loughborough University Library kindly hosts the Journal of Information Literacy on behalf of the CILIP Information Literacy Group.