The Necessity of using Problem Based Learning (PBL) and Structural Physical Models on an Educating Structural Course: Case Study of a Structural Systems Course, Master Degree Architecture Students

Main Article Content

Ladan Vojdanzade Katayoun Taghizade

Abstract

Teaching structure to architecture students is an important part of the architecture curriculum in faculties. Weak points of architecture students in using their knowledge and data in real environments has caused many problems in professional activities or withheld their essential skills. In this situation they cannot use their abilities and success in their job positions.   In this study, we aimed to promote learning structural behavior in a structural systems course, by using a method that is a blend of a Problem Based Learning (PBL) model and a physical model.  This was undertaken in structural studies for master degree students in the University of Tehran.  In the recent experiment, the theoretical class changed to a workshop and practical class and they learned and studied by working in a group and through hands-on activities to increase their skills and demonstrate abilities, so they are prepared for parallel situations in future.  The research method which has been used in this paper is based on the description of the subject feature. According to the research, a PBL model and Structural Physical Model are appropriate ways of understanding the structural behavior without using complicated mathematical formulas. It also provides the best technique for students’ preparation and learning.

Article Details

How to Cite
VOJDANZADE, Ladan; TAGHIZADE, Katayoun. The Necessity of using Problem Based Learning (PBL) and Structural Physical Models on an Educating Structural Course: Case Study of a Structural Systems Course, Master Degree Architecture Students. Design and Technology Education: an International Journal, [S.l.], v. 25, n. 3, p. 82-102, nov. 2020. ISSN 1360-1431. Available at: <https://ojs.lboro.ac.uk/DATE/article/view/2851>. Date accessed: 30 nov. 2020.
Section
Research